Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.

Establishing a broad base of community partnerships has enabled the City of Garfield to begin a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that can sustain itself.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

Foothill Elementary School in Boulder, CO, had been participating in International Walk to School Day for several years before a group of parents joined forces.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Since its inception in February 2006, the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s (ConnDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has awarded approximately $1.6 million.

Abernathy Elementary, Middle, and High School are on the same campus along a busy road. At least half of the students live within walking distance of the schools, but there are no sidewalks to help them reach the school safely.