Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

With the passage of the federal transportation legislation, SAFETEA-LU, in August 2005, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) began implementing its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Abernathy Elementary, Middle, and High School are on the same campus along a busy road. At least half of the students live within walking distance of the schools, but there are no sidewalks to help them reach the school safely.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

Rosa Guerrero Elementary is a Title 1 neighborhood school, and 75 percent of the 850 students live within walking distance of the school.

Foothill Elementary School in Boulder, CO, had been participating in International Walk to School Day for several years before a group of parents joined forces.

Unlike many of the surrounding schools, Gove Elementary in Belle Glade, FL, is confronted with unique challenges to implement its Safe Routes to School program.

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, applied for received $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).