Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

As one of the first states to enact Safe Routes to School legislation and the home to one of two original pilot SRTS projects, California has been a leader in the national SRTS movement for nearly a decade.

Plain City, UT, is a small town of about 5,000 citizens. On June 27, 2006, the Weber County School District passed a bond to build a new elementary school in Plain City.

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

In 2004, the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) participated in a Safe Routes to School pilot program held in three schools in the Chittenden County, VT, Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO).

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

Unlike many of the surrounding schools, Gove Elementary in Belle Glade, FL, is confronted with unique challenges to implement its Safe Routes to School program.