Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

In 2004, the Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) participated in a Safe Routes to School pilot program held in three schools in the Chittenden County, VT, Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO).

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.

At two elementary schools in Orlando, FL, nutrition and pedestrian and bicycle safety skills are taught in unison to help children create healthier lifestyles for themselves.

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.