Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

When officials from the Town of Pleasant View saw that children were walking to school—even without sidewalks—they decided to take action.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

Two Lawton, Oklahoma, schools have begun walking school buses to address different challenges, and both schools have seen unexpected benefits from their efforts.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.