Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

The Village of Canal Winchester, OH, has two elementary schools located near one another on the same campus.  In April 2008, the Village of Canal Winchester had a kick-off meeting for its SRTS projects.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

Parents at Bear Creek Elementary School in Boulder, Colo., are leading students and the entire school community into life-changing choices.

Oftentimes, it’s difficult for children disabilities to walk or bicycle to school, and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs are designed to remedy a wide range of barriers.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

Murch Elementary School built community consensus for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) efforts that enabled it to overcome barriers to walking and bicycling to school.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.