Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

With the passage of the federal transportation legislation, SAFETEA-LU, in August 2005, the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) began implementing its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Two Lawton, Oklahoma, schools have begun walking school buses to address different challenges, and both schools have seen unexpected benefits from their efforts.

Naramake Elementary School and Nathan Hale Middle School are located on Strawberry Hill Avenue, a minor arterial street in Norwalk, Connecticut.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

The West Virginia Safe Routes to School (WV-SRTS) program accomplished many goals during the 2007 fiscal year.

In 2005, and with only local funding, Safe Routes to School encouragement activities began at Valle Vista Elementary. These activities included bicycle rodeos, Walking Wednesdays and Walk to School Days.

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.