Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

Safe Routes to School coordinators at State Street School listened to parents while developing a program anchored by walking school buses that address worries about safety of children walking and bicycling to school.

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

Since 1999, Peoples Advocacy for Trails Hawaii (PATH) has been the lead agency in the state of Hawaii for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs.

Nine elementary and middle schools in Mansfield, OH, received funding for Safe Routes to School (SRTS) infrastructure and non-infrastructure projects through the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT).

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.