Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.

At two elementary schools in Orlando, FL, nutrition and pedestrian and bicycle safety skills are taught in unison to help children create healthier lifestyles for themselves.

Since its inception in February 2006, the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s (ConnDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has awarded approximately $1.6 million.

In 2005, and with only local funding, Safe Routes to School encouragement activities began at Valle Vista Elementary. These activities included bicycle rodeos, Walking Wednesdays and Walk to School Days.

Safe Routes to School coordinators at State Street School listened to parents while developing a program anchored by walking school buses that address worries about safety of children walking and bicycling to school.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

The Safe Routes to School program in Gilbert, AZ, focuses on promoting walking and bicycling to school with the help of partnerships with 30 schools in two school districts and with community organizations.