Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

Since its inception in February 2006, the Connecticut Department of Transportation’s (ConnDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has awarded approximately $1.6 million.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

As one of the first states to enact Safe Routes to School legislation and the home to one of two original pilot SRTS projects, California has been a leader in the national SRTS movement for nearly a decade.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Rosa Guerrero Elementary is a Title 1 neighborhood school, and 75 percent of the 850 students live within walking distance of the school.