Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.