Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

The community of Montpelier, VT, is promoting a different “Way To Go,” through an assortment of incentives and partnerships designed to help the program sustain itself in the future.

The West Virginia Safe Routes to School (WV-SRTS) program accomplished many goals during the 2007 fiscal year.

The Safe Routes to School program in Gilbert, AZ, focuses on promoting walking and bicycling to school with the help of partnerships with 30 schools in two school districts and with community organizations.

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.