Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

Piedmont Elementary School in Charleston, WV, is a public school for pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Oftentimes, it’s difficult for children disabilities to walk or bicycle to school, and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs are designed to remedy a wide range of barriers.

The Safe Routes to School program in Gilbert, AZ, focuses on promoting walking and bicycling to school with the help of partnerships with 30 schools in two school districts and with community organizations.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Recently, Mountain Rides Transportation Authority, a alternative transportation provider, and the Cities of Bellevue, Hailey and Ketchum in Blaine County, ID, received a grant for $312,000.

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.