Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

The Smyrna School District and the Town of Smyrna identified the goal of improving safety for children who already were walking and bicycling to school.

In 2005, and with only local funding, Safe Routes to School encouragement activities began at Valle Vista Elementary. These activities included bicycle rodeos, Walking Wednesdays and Walk to School Days.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Safe Routes to School coordinators at State Street School listened to parents while developing a program anchored by walking school buses that address worries about safety of children walking and bicycling to school.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

The federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program acted as a catalyst for New Plymouth, ID, to concentrate its efforts to improve safety and to encourage students to walk and bicycle to school.

More than 4,000 Portland metro area students from 30 schools signed up to compete against Portland State University (PSU) students in the Portland May 2008 Walk + Bike Challenge Month.

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.