Safe Routes Successes - Funding and Policy

To begin improving pedestrian safety, an AmeriCorps volunteer surveyed students and parents at each of the three schools to determine the number of students who walked, bicycled, rode in a private vehicle or rode the bus the school.

Shaw Elementary School is a neighborhood K-5th Title 1 school with 597 students. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the students live near enough to walk to school, but they face several barriers.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Oftentimes, it’s difficult for children disabilities to walk or bicycle to school, and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs are designed to remedy a wide range of barriers.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Establishing a broad base of community partnerships has enabled the City of Garfield to begin a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that can sustain itself.