Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In May 2003, Michigan’s Department of Transportation (DOT), in partnership with other organizations, convened a mini-conference.

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

Sherwood Forest Elementary School in Winston-Salem, NC, is making strides in its efforts to encourage safe walking to school.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

Two Lawton, Oklahoma, schools have begun walking school buses to address different challenges, and both schools have seen unexpected benefits from their efforts.

During the fall 2008 school year at Pawnee Elementary School in the City of Overland Park, KS, students will have a new bus stop to wait at — the pick-up area for the Walking School Bus.