Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.

MDOT agreed to fund a SRTS study identifying education, encouragement, enforcement and engineering projects that would increase the safety of students walking and bicycling to school.

The Parent Teachers Association (PTA) at Challenger Elementary School in Huntsville, Ala., has organized Walk to School Day in conjunction with International Walk to School Day for five years.
 

In summer 2005, the Maine Department of Transportation, through the Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, constructed a 0.6 mile long sidewalk that connects the library in the elementary school complex to a community park.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

The Edgewood Police Department took the lead in seeking to make the way to school safer for students in several schools in the city.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

Pierre, S.D., is a rural town with approximately 13,000 residents. One of its local elementary schools, Jefferson Elementary School, has more than 400 students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

In May 2003, Michigan’s Department of Transportation (DOT), in partnership with other organizations, convened a mini-conference.