Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In 2007, the city and  school system received a $102,919 SRTS infrastructure grant from the Missouri Department of Transportation to install uniform safety signage and flashing beacons at 8 different schools throughout the city.

Because of its rural setting, Longview Elementary School and the Moses Lake community faced unique issues surrounding child safety and safer walking programs.

Working together, township officials, county police, parents and school staff applied for and received $456,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to create a SRTS program.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

The New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is the culmination of a series of planning and developmental activities resulting in a  program to assist New Jersey communities.

In 2007, Polk Elementary was the target school of the Walk this Way program, which focuses on a different school within the Baton Rouge school district each year.

Safe Routes Nebraska is the Nebraska Department of Roads’ state-level implementation of the federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Anchorage, Alaska, has a winter dark period lasting from October until April, in which the sun rises as late as 10:00 a.m. and sets as early as 3:30 p.m.