Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In September 2008, Billings received bronze level status as a bicycle-friendly city from the American League of Bicyclists, thanks to its “Go Play” community awareness campaign.

A joint Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program was necessary because the schools are in a suburban area where nearby residents can walk to school.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

Law enforcement officers and school personnel worked together to design a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that addressed the concerns of the parents.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Shaw Elementary School is a neighborhood K-5th Title 1 school with 597 students. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the students live near enough to walk to school, but they face several barriers.

Rosa Guerrero Elementary is a Title 1 neighborhood school, and 75 percent of the 850 students live within walking distance of the school.

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.