Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The Parent Teachers Association (PTA) at Challenger Elementary School in Huntsville, Ala., has organized Walk to School Day in conjunction with International Walk to School Day for five years.
 

The New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is the culmination of a series of planning and developmental activities resulting in a  program to assist New Jersey communities.

Miami-Dade County had the highest incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the State and was third in the U.S. The rate of pediatric pedestrian injuries was also particularly high.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

In 2008, the town of Cottonwood received $87,575 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

When the PedNet Coalition in Columbia, MO organized daily Walking School Buses at West Boulevard Elementary School in fall 2006, only fifteen of the nearly 300 kindergarten through fifth grade students participated regularly.

Safe Routes to School coordinators at State Street School listened to parents while developing a program anchored by walking school buses that address worries about safety of children walking and bicycling to school.