Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

With the help of a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) grant, Meadowview Elementary staff developed and began implementing a SRTS program that addresses the infrastructure issues and promotes walking safely to school.

The Duluth-Superior Metropolitan Interstate Council (MIC) is the designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Duluth-Superior metropolitan area and began Safe Routes to School planning initiatives in the area.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

District 2 of Florida’s Department of Transportation manages a district-wide Safe Routes to School program that has provided pedestrian and bicycle safety outreach

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

Partnerships throughout the community enabled McCook Elementary School to develop a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

In summer 2007, the city of Liberty received $240,000 in Safe Routes to School funds through the Missouri Department of Transportation.

In September 2008, Billings received bronze level status as a bicycle-friendly city from the American League of Bicyclists, thanks to its “Go Play” community awareness campaign.