Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In May 2003, Michigan’s Department of Transportation (DOT), in partnership with other organizations, convened a mini-conference.

The Edgewood Police Department took the lead in seeking to make the way to school safer for students in several schools in the city.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Recently, Mountain Rides Transportation Authority, a alternative transportation provider, and the Cities of Bellevue, Hailey and Ketchum in Blaine County, ID, received a grant for $312,000.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Anchorage, Alaska, has a winter dark period lasting from October until April, in which the sun rises as late as 10:00 a.m. and sets as early as 3:30 p.m.

In summer 2007, the city of Liberty received $240,000 in Safe Routes to School funds through the Missouri Department of Transportation.

Recognizing that one of the most critical factors regarding the safety of children walking to school is motor vehicular speed, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) instituted the DC Neighborhood Pace Car pilot program.

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.