Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In 2008, the town of Cottonwood received $87,575 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

New Hope obtained a $31,200 SRTS grant in 2007 from the Minnesota Department of Transportation to help slow down vehicle traffic around its Sunny Hollow Elementary School and also to develop an education program for students.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

Safe Routes to School (SRTS) initiatives began at Lowell Elementary School in January 2007 and at Hosmer Elementary School in fall 2007.

The Village of Canal Winchester, OH, has two elementary schools located near one another on the same campus.  In April 2008, the Village of Canal Winchester had a kick-off meeting for its SRTS projects.

During the summer months, Yuma, Arizona, is a mid-sized city with approximately 85,000 residents.