Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In summer 2006, the Bicycle Pedestrian Advisory Board of Missoula, Mont., engaged school and community organizations in the creation of a city-wide Safe Routes to School (SRTS) steering group.

Shaw Elementary School is a neighborhood K-5th Title 1 school with 597 students. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the students live near enough to walk to school, but they face several barriers.

The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), a regional planning organization for Greater Kansas City, is training people to become “Safety Ambassadors".

New Hope obtained a $31,200 SRTS grant in 2007 from the Minnesota Department of Transportation to help slow down vehicle traffic around its Sunny Hollow Elementary School and also to develop an education program for students.

Working together, township officials, county police, parents and school staff applied for and received $456,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to create a SRTS program.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

It took coordination and cooperation among Hillside Elementary School, the Schenectady County Traffic Safety Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension, Schenectady County to organize a successful pedestrian safety program.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.