Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Despite the extraordinary economic challenges faced in Hamtramck, Mich., community leaders, local foundations and state government worked together to build a strong Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

In September 2008, Billings received bronze level status as a bicycle-friendly city from the American League of Bicyclists, thanks to its “Go Play” community awareness campaign.

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Safe Routes to School coordinators at State Street School listened to parents while developing a program anchored by walking school buses that address worries about safety of children walking and bicycling to school.

Recently, Mountain Rides Transportation Authority, a alternative transportation provider, and the Cities of Bellevue, Hailey and Ketchum in Blaine County, ID, received a grant for $312,000.