Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The Edgewood Police Department took the lead in seeking to make the way to school safer for students in several schools in the city.

During the summer months, Yuma, Arizona, is a mid-sized city with approximately 85,000 residents.

Recognizing that one of the most critical factors regarding the safety of children walking to school is motor vehicular speed, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) instituted the DC Neighborhood Pace Car pilot program.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

In 2007, the city and  school system received a $102,919 SRTS infrastructure grant from the Missouri Department of Transportation to install uniform safety signage and flashing beacons at 8 different schools throughout the city.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

The Village of Canal Winchester, OH, has two elementary schools located near one another on the same campus.  In April 2008, the Village of Canal Winchester had a kick-off meeting for its SRTS projects.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.