Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Recently, Mountain Rides Transportation Authority, a alternative transportation provider, and the Cities of Bellevue, Hailey and Ketchum in Blaine County, ID, received a grant for $312,000.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Together, the city of Murray and the Murray Independent School District are working to make the way to school safer for children.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

A grassroots program, Healthy Waltham Initiative, brought the Executive Office of Transportation’s Massachusetts Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to Whittemore Elementary School in Waltham, Mass.

In 2008, Stowe Elementary received $171,360 in Safe Routes to School funding from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

The Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Project (NMTPP) in Sheboygan County, WI, was borne out of federal transportation legislation in 2005.