Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

The New Jersey Department of Transportation’s (NJDOT) Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is the culmination of a series of planning and developmental activities resulting in a  program to assist New Jersey communities.

For several years the City of Rockville has coordinated Safe Routes to School programs in Rockville schools with an emphasis on education, enforcement, encouragement programs, and transportation improvements.

With the help of a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) grant, Meadowview Elementary staff developed and began implementing a SRTS program that addresses the infrastructure issues and promotes walking safely to school.

Despite the extraordinary economic challenges faced in Hamtramck, Mich., community leaders, local foundations and state government worked together to build a strong Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.