Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Piedmont Elementary School in Charleston, WV, is a public school for pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

In Maryland, the state Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is administered by the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) through the Regional and Intermodal Planning Division (RIPD). 

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.