Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

During the late 1980s and early 1990s, the City of Green River, Wyo., began construction on the Greenbelt Pathways and Trail System.

Washington’s Safe Routes to School (W-SRTS) program began in 2004, when the Washington State legislature funded a Safe Routes to School pilot project.

The city of West Lafayette decided to develop and implement a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to improve the conditions for the children who walk to the schools.

Putney Central School is a kindergarten through eighth grade school in Putney, Vermont, a rural area with a town population of approximately 2,600 residents.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), a regional planning organization for Greater Kansas City, is training people to become “Safety Ambassadors".

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

Three years ago Principal Edgar Miranda moved from Rochester, NY to Arlington, VA, and he rented a home in the neighborhood near Ashlawn Elementary School where he would work.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.