Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.

Lincoln Elementary School is in a small city in a rural county. Many of the roads surrounding the school are suitable for walking, but until the introduction of a Healthy School pilot program, not many students were encouraged to walk.

Abernathy Elementary, Middle, and High School are on the same campus along a busy road. At least half of the students live within walking distance of the schools, but there are no sidewalks to help them reach the school safely.

The Forest Park Elementary School PTA utilized strengths of its parent volunteers.

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

The City of Holladay, Utah, decided to incorporate a Safe Sidewalks program into its city plans in 2003.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.