Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

In 2008, the town of Cottonwood received $87,575 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

Plain City, UT, is a small town of about 5,000 citizens. On June 27, 2006, the Weber County School District passed a bond to build a new elementary school in Plain City.

The Nebraska Department of Roads (NDOR) launched Safe Routes Nebraska (SRN) in October 2006.

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

Thanks to the efforts of one energetic parent, Ira B. Jones Elementary School in Asheville, N.C., has been participating in International Walk to School Day for a number of years.

The Duluth-Superior Metropolitan Interstate Council (MIC) is the designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Duluth-Superior metropolitan area and began Safe Routes to School planning initiatives in the area.

The Montana Nutrition and Physical Activity Program at Montana State University in Bozeman, in collaboration with the local Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Task Force, initiated a SRTS pilot program at the Emily Dickinson Elementary School.

In September 2008, Billings received bronze level status as a bicycle-friendly city from the American League of Bicyclists, thanks to its “Go Play” community awareness campaign.

Go! Chapel Hill Active Living by Design is a national program that helped to facilitate the spread and success of the Active Routes to School program in Chapel Hill.