Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

Safe Routes to School (SRTS) initiatives began at Lowell Elementary School in January 2007 and at Hosmer Elementary School in fall 2007.

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

The Safe Routes to School program in Spartanburg County, S.C. focuses on teaching safety, making the environment safer and increasing the number of families that are able to walk to school.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.