Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Thanks to the efforts of one energetic parent, Ira B. Jones Elementary School in Asheville, N.C., has been participating in International Walk to School Day for a number of years.

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

Massachusetts’ commitment to safe school routes and more physically active student travel predates the federal Safe Routes to School legislation.

Anchorage, Alaska, has a winter dark period lasting from October until April, in which the sun rises as late as 10:00 a.m. and sets as early as 3:30 p.m.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

The Edgewood Police Department took the lead in seeking to make the way to school safer for students in several schools in the city.

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

During the summer months, Yuma, Arizona, is a mid-sized city with approximately 85,000 residents.