Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Recognizing that one of the most critical factors regarding the safety of children walking to school is motor vehicular speed, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) instituted the DC Neighborhood Pace Car pilot program.

For the past 20 years Safe Kids, a group focused on injury prevention in children, has worked with the Grand Forks school district, in Grand Forks, N.D., to encourage its students to walk and bicycle safely to school.

The Denver Osteopathic Foundation partnered with Denver Public Schools to launch a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to increase walking and bicycling at Ellis Elementary and other schools in Denver, Colo.

In summer 2005, the Maine Department of Transportation, through the Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, constructed a 0.6 mile long sidewalk that connects the library in the elementary school complex to a community park.

The first Walking and Wheeling Day at Lake Norman Elementary School in Mooresville, NC, was inspired by none other than one persistent third grade student at the school.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

In 2002, a federal judge ended a 25-year-old program of cross-town busing in Dayton, OH. As a result, pedestrian and bicycle safety has become one of the most critical issues facing the city.

Law enforcement officers and school personnel worked together to design a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that addressed the concerns of the parents.

The Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA) is a non-profit organization founded in 1962 to unite the members of its inner-city community in northern Chicago.