Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

When officials from the Town of Pleasant View saw that children were walking to school—even without sidewalks—they decided to take action.

Working together, township officials, county police, parents and school staff applied for and received $456,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to create a SRTS program.

Safe Routes to School is a fully institutionalized program at Oakbrook Middle School, but this was not always the case. 

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

Shaw Elementary School is a neighborhood K-5th Title 1 school with 597 students. Approximately 75 to 80 percent of the students live near enough to walk to school, but they face several barriers.

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

Piedmont Elementary School in Charleston, WV, is a public school for pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.

Miami-Dade County had the highest incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the State and was third in the U.S. The rate of pediatric pedestrian injuries was also particularly high.

In Maryland, the state Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is administered by the Maryland State Highway Administration (SHA) through the Regional and Intermodal Planning Division (RIPD).