Safe Routes Successes - Enforcement

Northeast Elementary School began an SRTS program five years ago that utilizes the generosity of the community — and the creativity of the school staff — to provide incentives to encourage students to walk to school.

Faced with increasing pedestrian injuries and deaths, Pitt County formed the Walk this Way Pedestrian Safety Task Force, whose members share a common goal: to make the community safer for pedestrians.

The Kansas SRTS program has established itself as an influential and innovative state program.

Because of its rural setting, Longview Elementary School and the Moses Lake community faced unique issues surrounding child safety and safer walking programs.

In summer 2005, the Maine Department of Transportation, through the Bicycle/Pedestrian Program, constructed a 0.6 mile long sidewalk that connects the library in the elementary school complex to a community park.

Starkville in Motion (SIM), a volunteer organization formed in 2005, is dedicated to increasing the number of bicycle and pedestrian paths in Starkville.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

In summer 2007, Mississippi’s Department of Transportation announced that Petal would receive $213,028 in federal Safe Routes to School funds.

In summer 2007, the city of Liberty received $240,000 in Safe Routes to School funds through the Missouri Department of Transportation.