Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

During the summer months, Yuma, Arizona, is a mid-sized city with approximately 85,000 residents.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

The community of Montpelier, VT, is promoting a different “Way To Go,” through an assortment of incentives and partnerships designed to help the program sustain itself in the future.

In less than a year, a nearly 40 percent reduction in motor vehicle traffic resulted at Eagle Crest Elementary School.

Thomas Elementary School was one of three schools that benefited from the $39,000 federal SRTS noninfrastructure award.

In the fall of 2011, school staff took action to sustain enthusiasm for walking and biking and to create long-term changes in student travel patterns.

The village of Ossining, NY, is located within Westchester County, NY, along the Hudson River. The necessary busing program and a lack of physical infrastructure prevent many children from walking to school.

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.