Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

During the summer months, Yuma, Arizona, is a mid-sized city with approximately 85,000 residents.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Safe Routes Chagrin is a truly cooperative endeavor which has improved safety and encouraged more students to walk and bike while building a sustainable program supported by the entire community.

Pierre, S.D., is a rural town with approximately 13,000 residents. One of its local elementary schools, Jefferson Elementary School, has more than 400 students in kindergarten through fifth grade.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Foothill Elementary School in Boulder, CO, had been participating in International Walk to School Day for several years before a group of parents joined forces.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.

In the fall of 2011, school staff took action to sustain enthusiasm for walking and biking and to create long-term changes in student travel patterns.

In 2006, Muscle Powered, a local walking and bicycling advocacy group in Carson City, Nev., initiated a project to pilot a Walk to School program at two elementary schools using a $12,000 grant from the Nevada Office of Traffic Safety.