Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

In 2003, Patricia Parsons, a health promotion specialist for Chronic Disease Prevention at the Benton County Health Department, decided to implement a sustainable program to help prevent childhood obesity.

Safe Kids Tampa, led by St. Joseph’s Children’s Hospital of Tampa, has tailored its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Maybe it’s not feasible to travel by jet pack, but that didn’t stop students from including the idea on a middle school mural that highlights creative, non-car ways to arrive at school.

Maricopa County Department of Public Health- Office of Health Promotion and Education in 2008 began working with Griffith Elementary School on “Walk n-Rollers.”

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.

The Non-Motorized Transportation Pilot Project (NMTPP) in Sheboygan County, WI, was borne out of federal transportation legislation in 2005.

The Smyrna School District and the Town of Smyrna identified the goal of improving safety for children who already were walking and bicycling to school.

In the fall of 2011, school staff took action to sustain enthusiasm for walking and biking and to create long-term changes in student travel patterns.