Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Two Lawton, Oklahoma, schools have begun walking school buses to address different challenges, and both schools have seen unexpected benefits from their efforts.

Longfellow Elementary School has participated in Walk to School Day for more than ten years and just joined Safe Routes to School.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

In the fall of 2011, school staff took action to sustain enthusiasm for walking and biking and to create long-term changes in student travel patterns.

Henry Zarrow International is a kindergarten through fifth grade magnet school in Tulsa, Okla. Being a magnet school, students, if accepted, can attend Zarrow regardless of the distance.

In 2003, Patricia Parsons, a health promotion specialist for Chronic Disease Prevention at the Benton County Health Department, decided to implement a sustainable program to help prevent childhood obesity.

Alpine Elementary School, a K–6th grade school with 780 students, is part of Utah’s Alpine School District, the lowest funded school district in the nation.