Safe Routes Successes - Encouragement

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

The Wichita Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (WAMPO) region encompasses 10 different school districts within Wichita, Kansas, and several smaller surrounding communities.

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

Piedmont Elementary School in Charleston, WV, is a public school for pre-kindergarten through fifth grade.


The St. Thomas Aquinas SRTS team consists of parents, neighbors, teachers and administrators. 

Henry Zarrow International is a kindergarten through fifth grade magnet school in Tulsa, Okla. Being a magnet school, students, if accepted, can attend Zarrow regardless of the distance.

The Riverside County Department of Public Health Injury Prevention Services (IPS) developed a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program at several priority schools.