Safe Routes Successes - Education

Delaware's Safe Routes to School Program began in May 2004 after a SRTS Program was formally established through a bill that included starting pilot programs in schools throughout the state.

In August 2000, the Marin County Bicycle Coalition was funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to participate in a Safe Routes to School pilot program.

Miami-Dade County had the highest incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the State and was third in the U.S. The rate of pediatric pedestrian injuries was also particularly high.

In 2006, Muscle Powered, a local walking and bicycling advocacy group in Carson City, Nev., initiated a project to pilot a Walk to School program at two elementary schools using a $12,000 grant from the Nevada Office of Traffic Safety.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Michigan is one of the most "overweight states," which provided a big incentive for community leaders to try to get children active at a young age and ingrain that activity so that it will be habit later in life.

At two elementary schools in Orlando, FL, nutrition and pedestrian and bicycle safety skills are taught in unison to help children create healthier lifestyles for themselves.

Flippin, AR, is a rural town that is home to Flippin Elementary School, Flippin Middle School and Flippin High School.

Roosevelt Middle School and the surrounding community of Eugene, Oregon, have successfully developed a team of community organizations committed to providing Safe Routes to School (SRTS) for children.