Safe Routes Successes - Education

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

The kindergarten through sixth grade students at Shelley Elementary School in American Fork, UT, have no bus system to take them to and from school.

Neighborhoods and schools in Taylor will be connected with a 2.4-mile pedestrian and bike path to make the way to school safer for elementary, middle and high school students.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Alexandria, VA, is a compact city with more than 128,000 residents living in a 15 square mile area.

Recognizing that one of the most critical factors regarding the safety of children walking to school is motor vehicular speed, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) instituted the DC Neighborhood Pace Car pilot program.

Orleans Elementary School, a kindergarten through eighth grade school in the village of Orleans, VT, has participated in International Walk to School day since 2006.

In 1995, the Auburn School District linked concerns about the high cost of transportation and increased childhood obesity to create cooperation that has led to 20 percent of its district’s students walking to school.

Heatherwood Elementary increased the percentage of students regularly walking and bicycling from 12 percent to more than 43 percent in the first three years of the program.