Safe Routes Successes - Education

In 2006, Muscle Powered, a local walking and bicycling advocacy group in Carson City, Nev., initiated a project to pilot a Walk to School program at two elementary schools using a $12,000 grant from the Nevada Office of Traffic Safety.

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.

Miami-Dade County had the highest incidence of pedestrian injuries and fatalities in the State and was third in the U.S. The rate of pediatric pedestrian injuries was also particularly high.

Melrose Elementary and Lawn Middle Schools in Jamestown, Rhode Island, have been concerned about students safely walking to school for several years.

The Smyrna School District and the Town of Smyrna identified the goal of improving safety for children who already were walking and bicycling to school.

Abernathy Elementary, Middle, and High School are on the same campus along a busy road. At least half of the students live within walking distance of the schools, but there are no sidewalks to help them reach the school safely.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

Since 2006, the number of walking school buses at Green Street School in Brattleboro, Vermont, has more than tripled, thanks to parents’ steady support of Safe Routes to School.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.