Safe Routes Successes - Education

Maybe it’s not feasible to travel by jet pack, but that didn’t stop students from including the idea on a middle school mural that highlights creative, non-car ways to arrive at school.

The first SRTS programs began at MacKinnon Middle and Duffy Elementary School, with the goal of encouraging more children to walk or bicycle to school.

Safe Routes Chagrin is a truly cooperative endeavor which has improved safety and encouraged more students to walk and bike while building a sustainable program supported by the entire community.

Hillside students walk to downtown Allegan because it serves as a classroom for them to practice life skills.

Recognizing that one of the most critical factors regarding the safety of children walking to school is motor vehicular speed, the Washington Area Bicyclist Association (WABA) instituted the DC Neighborhood Pace Car pilot program.

September 10, 2002 marked the beginning of Delaware’s Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program when state SRTS legislation was signed into law.

The Smyrna School District and the Town of Smyrna identified the goal of improving safety for children who already were walking and bicycling to school.

In September 2007, the Coconino County Health Department received $39,000 in federal funding awarded through the Arizona Department of Transportation to jumpstart its Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program.

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) committee in the City of New London, IA, is in the beginning phases of implementing its SRTS activities within the community.