Safe Routes Successes - Education

Jericho Elementary School, a kindergarten through fourth grade school faced two obstacles in creating a Safe Routes to School program: few students living within walking distance, and a highway next to the school.

Chula Vista is in southwest California and has the largest kindergarten through sixth grade district in the state.

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

The Wichita Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (WAMPO) region encompasses 10 different school districts within Wichita, Kansas, and several smaller surrounding communities.

In 2006, Muscle Powered, a local walking and bicycling advocacy group in Carson City, Nev., initiated a project to pilot a Walk to School program at two elementary schools using a $12,000 grant from the Nevada Office of Traffic Safety.

In August 2000, the Marin County Bicycle Coalition was funded by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to participate in a Safe Routes to School pilot program.

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) committee in the City of New London, IA, is in the beginning phases of implementing its SRTS activities within the community.

The city of West Lafayette decided to develop and implement a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to improve the conditions for the children who walk to the schools.

Maybe it’s not feasible to travel by jet pack, but that didn’t stop students from including the idea on a middle school mural that highlights creative, non-car ways to arrive at school.