Program organization

December 2006 Status Report

The Monthly SRTS Program Tracking Brief is prepared by the National Center for Safe Routes to School to provide information about State SRTS programs. Each month, a different snapshot and brief analysis of one key trend across all State programs is presented. It also provides a tracking table summarizing key attributes from all programs.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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NCSRTS Six Month Report: 2007

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School
Resource File: 

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Safe Ways to School Toolkit

Toolkit created by the Florida Traffic and Bicycle Safety Education Program that can be used by schools throughout the state and nation to create a safer bicycling and walking environment for children. Includes a student travel survey, a school site design assessment, a neighborhood site assessment, parent and student attitudinal surveys, a video, "How To" manual, clipboard, pen and file folders.

Authoring Organization: 
Florida Traffic and Bicycle Safety Education Program

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November 2006 Status Report

The Monthly SRTS Program Tracking Brief is prepared by the National Center for Safe Routes to School to provide information about State SRTS programs. Each month, a different snapshot and brief analysis of one key trend across all State programs is presented. It also provides a tracking table summarizing key attributes from all programs.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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Are Indian tribes eligible to receive Safe Routes to School funding?

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has determined that federally recognized tribes are eligible sub-recipients of the state-administered Safe Routes to School program. FHWA believes that the list of eligible sub-recipients listed in statute, Section 1404 (e) of SAFETEA-LU, is illustrative for purposes of tribal eligibility. Thus, tribes may be eligible sub-recipients, even though the tribes are not expressly listed.

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Who is my State Safe Routes to School Coordinator?

To find out who your State Safe Routes to School Coordinator is, please visit our Find State Contacts page.

How can I start a Safe Routes to School Program?

While every community is unique, the basic steps to starting a Safe Routes to School program include:

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How can I involve members of my community?

Start by identifying people within your community who want to make walking and bicycling to school safe and appealing for children. Sharing concerns, interests and knowledge among a variety of community members with diverse expertise can enable groups to tackle many different issues. Bringing together the right people is the first step to changing a community's point of view.

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