Program organization

America Walks Safe Routes to School Start-up Checklist

SAFE ROUTES to SCHOOL START-UP CHECKLIST

Authoring Organization: 
America Walks & Physical Activity and Policy Research Network

Executive Proclamation

Example of a form letter or resolution for governmental support of a local Safe Routes to School program?

Authoring Organization: 
Howard County, Maryland
Resource File: 

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What is the history of Walk to School Day?

International Walk to School Day started in Britain in 1994 and has since grown to over 42 countries. It came to the U.S. in 1997 when the Partnership for a Walkable America launched its first walk in Chicago. Later that year, Los Angeles held a walk. Walk To School Week acquired its own dedicated week in mid-May in Great Britain. Click here for more on the history

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Stop + Walk Campaign Manual

Stop + Walk encourages parents driving to school to drop-off or pick-up their children 2-4 blocks away from school. This allows students to walk the rest of the way and get some exercise. Stop + Walk targets traffic congestion around schools. By having more students walk to school, we decrease traffic congestion and pollution around the school and increase physical activity and student safety. More information is at http://www.saferoutesportland.org

Authoring Organization: 
Portland Safer Routes to School
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How can I find out what local communities in my state are participating, or have developed Safe Routes to School Programs?

The federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is administered at the state level by each state's Department of Transportation (DOT.) To learn if there are local programs near you please visit your state's Safe Routes to School website or contact your State Safe Routes to School Coordinator.

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National Safe Routes to School Task Force Report

The National Safe Routes to School Task Force has released its final report, Safe Routes to School: A Transportation Legacy — A National Strategy to Increase Safety and Physical Activity among American Youth (PDF, 3.6 MB).

Authoring Organization: 
National Safe Routes to School Task Force
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Marin County Bicycle Coalition Safe Routes to School Lesson Plans

These lesson plans, developed by the Marin County Bicycle Coalition in 2003, are designed to teach safe walking and biking practices to children in grades K-8.

Grade 1 and up:

Grade 2:

Grade 4:

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Portland "Kids on the Move" Curriculum

This curriculum, designed by the Portland Office of Transportation, is composed of 25 lessons designed to involve students (grades preK-5) in both classroom and active/hands-on learning.  The lessons included here are focused on protecting/improving the environment and student safety, and are not specific to Portland.  The full curriculum is available at www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/40561.

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Drive Clean Across Texas

The Texas Department of Transportation has developed a variety of materials and lesson plans that cover air quality and transportation. There are activities for grades K-12 that incorporate air pollution, climate change, and transportation into science, math, social studies and language arts classes.

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Marin County Bicycle Coalition Safe Routes to School Lesson Plans

These environmental lesson plans include games, activities, experiments, and stories to teach students in grades K-8 about personal choices (with a focus on transportation) and energy use.

Lessons, Grades 1-2

Lessons, Grades 5-8

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