Program organization

Green Forest, Arkansas: Walking School Bus participants identify barriers

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Introduction

Students in Green Forest, AR, literally are leading the way to help the city identify improvements needed to make routes safer for children to walk to school.

Niskayuna, New York: Collaboration and cooperation in Niskayuna

It took coordination and cooperation among Hillside Elementary School, the Schenectady County Traffic Safety Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension, Schenectady County to organize a successful pedestrian safety program.

Introduction

It took coordination and cooperation among Hillside Elementary School, the Schenectady County Traffic Safety Program and Cornell Cooperative Extension, Schenectady County (CCE,SC) to organize a successful pedestrian safety program at Hillside Elementary in Niskayuna, NY.

Rebecca Cigal, the community education associate at Hillside Elementary, first heard of Safe Routes to School (SRTS) at a focus group conducted by the community education department in spring 2007, and she said she thought it would be a good project for her position.

Carson City, Nevada: Grassroots effort leads to two SRTS pilot programs

In 2006, Muscle Powered, a local walking and bicycling advocacy group in Carson City, Nev., initiated a project to pilot a Walk to School program at two elementary schools using a $12,000 grant from the Nevada Office of Traffic Safety.

Introduction

Las Cruces, New Mexico: SRTS Trailblazers

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

Introduction

Before Congress passed the SAFETEA-LU transportation legislation in 2005, the Las Cruces Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO) in Las Cruces, NM, adopted Safe Routes to School (SRTS) policies into its transportation plan.

“We actually started on the SRTS project prior to the state’s SRTS program getting started,” said Andy Hume, associate planner for the MPO. “We wrote one of the first action plans in the state.”

Garfield, New Jersey: Health Department forges alliances to benefit urban schoolchildren

Establishing a broad base of community partnerships has enabled the City of Garfield to begin a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that can sustain itself.

Introduction

Establishing a broad base of community partnerships has enabled the City of Garfield to begin a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program that can sustain itself. Although Garfield is comprised of less than 2.2 square miles, it has nine parks, a Boys and Girls Club, a YMCA and two walking paths. Despite such amenities, however, the high concentration of people combined with the lack of busing to schools contributed to significant traffic congestion around the schools.

Featured Resource: The Latest SRTS Case Studies Online

The National Center for Safe Routes to School has a collection of case studies on-line that show how communities are using their SRTS awards to overcome obstacles and work with other community partners to provide safe routes to school. Check out the latest case studies by selecting a state on the Center's website to see what's happening:

Going High-tech with Safe Routes to School

There are many ways to build a successful Safe Routes to School program. Using technology to assist with recruitment, walk and bike to school counts, evaluation and mapping can be extremely helpful. This one-hour, free webinar covers how "high-tech" solutions can help advance the success of SRTS programs.

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What type of SRTS options are there for schools that have limited number of students able to walk/bike to school (choice schools, private schools, schools on the edge of town, etc)?

The Safe Routes to School program has two main goals: (1) to make it safer for students who are walking/biking to school; and (2) to encourage students