Policy & funding

Johnson City, Tennessee: Walking and Bicycling Path improves safety

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Introduction

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Huntingdon, Tennessee: Huntingdon schools focus on safe sidewalks

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Introduction

Chattanooga, Tennessee: Hamilton County School District benefits from SRTS funds

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County.

Introduction

In March 2006, Safe Routes Chattanooga, a program of the Regional Planning Agency in Chattanooga, TN, was awarded $364,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) federal funds through the Tennessee Department of Transportation to be distributed to seven schools in Hamilton County. Of this funding, $334,000 is for infrastructure improvements, and $30,000 is for the development of a pedestrian and bicycle safety educational program for the school district.

Louisburg, Kansas: City Officials and Students Work Together for SRTS

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, applied for received $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

Introduction

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, worked with the city of Louisburg in applying for and receiving $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT). This funding will help create a safer community for Louisburg Middle School and Louisburg Elementary School by improving the pedestrian infrastructure. After these improvements are completed, a student group at Louisburg High School will begin SRTS encouragement activities for the elementary and middle school students.

Wilmette, Illinois: Bicycle Safety Goes Beyond the School Year

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.

Introduction

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people. With the combined efforts of its Bicycle Task Force and the local law enforcement, Wilmette implemented an encouragement program for bicycling around the town and to and from school.

Sherman, Illinois: Big Plans in Sherman Illinois

During the 2007 to 2008 school year, the Sherman School District and the town of Sherman, IL, applied for and received $247,975 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Illinois Department of Transportation (IL DOT).

Introduction

Machesney Park, Illinois: Collaboration is key to community’s SRTS program

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Introduction

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Children’s health is the impetus for the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program in the 23,000-person Village, according to Karen Lemmons, the community development director for Machesney Park. The benefits of the program extend to making the schools and environment safer.

Illinois: Finding SRTS opportunities for children with disabilities

Oftentimes, it’s difficult for children disabilities to walk or bicycle to school, and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs are designed to remedy a wide range of barriers.

Introduction

Oftentimes, it’s difficult for children disabilities to walk or bicycle to school, and Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs are designed to remedy a wide range of barriers.

But consider the student who has a disability: Can he or she participate in SRTS?

New Plymouth, Idaho: Using Funding as a Program Catalyst

The federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program acted as a catalyst for New Plymouth, ID, to concentrate its efforts to improve safety and to encourage students to walk and bicycle to school.

Introduction

Coeur d’Alene, Idaho: Education Efforts Complement Infrastructure Improvements

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger.

Introduction

What began as a sidewalks infrastructure project along routes to schools in Coeur d’Alene blossomed into something bigger when the city used a small non-infrastructure grant for education and encouragement efforts.