Policy & funding

From the Margins to the Mainstream

The Surface Transportation Policy Partnership offers a guide designed to help the user understand the transportation opportunities in their community. The guide provides a rationale on why planning is fundamental to providing transportation options and locating funding sources to cover the costs of projects. Also discussed are ways to design safe, healthy and livable communities and ways to create greater transportation choice and access.

Authoring Organization: 
Surface Transportation Policy Partnership

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November 2006 Status Report

The Monthly SRTS Program Tracking Brief is prepared by the National Center for Safe Routes to School to provide information about State SRTS programs. Each month, a different snapshot and brief analysis of one key trend across all State programs is presented. It also provides a tracking table summarizing key attributes from all programs.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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A Walking Tour of Canada

Once registered, you will be able to LOG the total kilometers that your students have walked to and from school. These distances will be tracked on the online Walking Tour of Canada map to show the students how far they have walked across Canada. As the accumulated distances reach each provincial/territorial capital, you will be able to download a provincial/territorial PASSPORT to congratulate the students on their success so far.

Authoring Organization: 
Go for Green, Active & Safe Routes to Schools

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Are Indian tribes eligible to receive Safe Routes to School funding?

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) has determined that federally recognized tribes are eligible sub-recipients of the state-administered Safe Routes to School program. FHWA believes that the list of eligible sub-recipients listed in statute, Section 1404 (e) of SAFETEA-LU, is illustrative for purposes of tribal eligibility. Thus, tribes may be eligible sub-recipients, even though the tribes are not expressly listed.

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Who selects and prioritizes projects for funding through the federal Safe Routes to School program?

Projects that are funded through the Federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program are selected and prioritized by a process that the Department of Transportation (DOT) in each state establishes. To determine the process in your particular state contact the SRTS Coordinator at your DOT. For Coordinator contact information by state please visit our Find State Contacts page.

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How did Safe Routes to School begin?

The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) concept began in Denmark in the late 1970s as part of a very successful initiative to reduce the number of children killed while walking and bicycling to school. Safe Routes to School spread internationally, with programs springing up in throughout Europe, in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United States.

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Pedestrian and Bicycle Funding Sources

Funding sources for bicycle and pedestrian facilities and programs can be found at all levels of government as well as in the private sector. This Web site contains a variety of funding and provides additional resources and links to other websites for further information.

Authoring Organization: 
Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center (PBIC)

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Safe Routes to School Federal Program Guidelines

The website for the Federal Safe Routes to School Program includes information on the federal guidance, an overview of the federal funding and a series of frequently asked questions.

Authoring Organization: 
Federal Highway Administration

How to Develop a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan

How to Develop a Pedestrian Safety Action Plan will help state and local officials know where to begin to address pedestrian safety issues. It is also intended to assist agencies in further enhancing their existing pedestrian safety programs and activities, including identifying safety problems, analyzing information, and selecting optimal solutions. The guide also contains information on how to involve stakeholders, potential sources of funding for implementing projects and how to evaluate projects.

Authoring Organization: 
Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center (PBIC), Federal Highway Administration (FHWA)
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