Policy & funding

Case Study: Camp Verde, Arizona

Safe Kids Tucson, through the Tucson Medical Center in Pima County, AZ, recently was awarded $40,790 in federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds to set up SRTS pedestrian and bicycle safety education and encouragement programs at seven schools in the county. These schools are Bloom Elementary School, Johnson Primary School, Lawrence Intermediate School, Rattlesnake Ridge Elementary School, Whitmore Elementary School, Keeling Elementary School and Davis Primary Magnet School.

Can crossing guards be funded through this program?

With regarding to the federal Safe Routes to School Program, Section III (Eligible Activities) of the federal program guidelines states, "Program funds should not be used to pay crossing guard salaries, as these are reoccurring costs (although funds may be used for crossing guard training programs)."

Explore other program tools:

Fall 2007 SRTS Program Tracking Brief

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School
Resource File: 

Explore other program tools:

Can SRTS help our community build sidewalks and bike lanes on our streets if the children ride a bus and the roadways are not safe?

The short answer is we believe an SRTS Program can help. However, please keep in mind that an SRTS program is more than a sidewalk and infrastructure program. For SRTS programs to be most effective they should be comprehensive and include most if not all of the 5 E's (engineering, education, encouragement, enforcement and evaluation). Visit our comprehensive SRTS Guide online for more on each of the E's and to see how they work together.

At what age can children walk to school by themselves?

There is no federal law setting a legal age minimum before children can walk to school alone. For a law specific to your state, contact the Safe Routes to School Coordinator local with in your state's Department of Transportation. You may also want to contact the school district or school where the child attends to determine if they have a policy that prohibits children under a certain age from walking to school alone.

Explore other program tools:

How do school siting policies affect school travel patterns?

In many places it is common to see aging neighborhood elementary schools  close and be replaced by "consolidated" elementary school that is located in a farm field somewhere off a major arterial road or state highway. This often makes walking and biking to school very difficult.

The following are examples of what some communities are doing around school siting that supports walkability and bike-ability:

Explore other program tools:

Summer 2007 SRTS Program Tracking Brief

The Quarterly SRTS Program Tracking Brief is prepared by the National Center for Safe Routes to School to provide information about State SRTS programs. Each quarter, a different snapshot and brief analysis of one key trend across all State programs is presented. It also provides a tracking table summarizing key attributes from all programs.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School
Resource File: 

Explore other program tools:

An Analysis of North Carolina Guidelines and Criteria for Establishing School Walk Zones

The North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT), Division of Bicycle and Pedestrian Transportation initiated a project to research the potential for development of standardized school walk zone policies for the state. A School Transportation Group was selected to undertake the study.

The resulting effort included the following activities:

Authoring Organization: 
North Carolina Department of Transportation, North Carolina State University, University of North Ca

Explore other program tools:

School Administrator's Guide to School Walk Routes and Student Pedestrian Safety

Authoring Organization: 
Washington Traffic Safety Commission and Washington State DOT