Policy & funding

Spring 2008 SRTS Program Tracking Brief

The national Safe Routes to School program again grew at an impressive rate during the first quarter (January to March) of 2008, with total committed spending jumping nearly 21 percent from $183.7 million at the end of 2007 to approximately $221.7 million at the end of March 2008. This increase of $38 million is the second largest quarterly increase in announced SRTS spending since the program began in 2006.

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How are school crossing guards paid?

The funding mechanism for school crossing guards can vary from city to
city. In some locations the crossing guard is funded by the police department, in other locations the financial responsibility is fully on
the school system or the individual school. In other locations the city and school system split the cost. Someone at the school should be able to clarify who is responsible for providing crossguards..

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Do parents need to sign a liability waiver for Walking School Bus?

Attitudes toward liability vary considerably. In an informal, simple walking school bus, participants generally do not have concerns due to the loose nature of the group. In more structured programs, organizers may want to address the issue of liability. In some cases, PTO/PTA insurance will cover walking school bus volunteers. School officials may need to ask the district risk management attorney to help them find solutions to liability concerns such as the use of parent consent forms.

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Winter 2007 SRTS Program Tracking Brief

The National Safe Routes to School program continued its steady expansion and growth again during the fourth quarter of 2007 (October to December), with total committed spending jumping from $156 million at the end of September to approximately $183.7 million at the end of December. This $27.7 million increase is an expansion of 17.8 percent.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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When can I apply for Safe Routes to School funding?

Applying for funds from the federal Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program will vary by state since each state's department of transportation is responsible for setting up and administering their SRTS program.

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Is there a list of what cities or organizations within each state received federal Safe Routes to School funds?

Yes. To see where Safe Routes to School funds have been awarded, visit our SRTS Interactive Map. Here, you can discover which schools, school districts, and communities have or will benefit from federal SRTS funding.

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Travel to School: The Distance Factor

The Federal Highway Administration's Office of Policy has published Travel to School: The Distance Factor. The independent research using data from the National Household Travel Survey explores how children's mode of travel to school has changed over time. Highlights include:

Authoring Organization: 
U.S. Department of Transportation: Federal Highway Administration
Resource File: 

Case Study: Chattanooga, Tennessee

Big Ridge Elementary School is located in a suburban area designed for motor vehicles. The area around the school lacks sidewalks, so most children cannot walk or bicycle safely to school. The few students that do walk must pass through the campus of a church located across the street and then cross the street with the help of a traffic control officer.

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