Policy & funding

Minimizing Your Liability Risk

This fact sheet, developed in 2010 by the National Policy and Legal Analysis Network to Prevent Childhood Obesity (NPLAN), a ChangeLab Solutions project, explains why liability fears shouldn’t stop school districts from supporting SRTS programs.  It provides an overview of liability and negligence, and offers practical tips on how school districts and others can reduce their risk of liability.

December Webinar: Fresh Ideas from the 2012 Oberstar SRTS Award Program

As the importance of drawing upon community assets to sustain SRTS programs continues to grow, thinking beyond the "usual suspects" as partners is more important than ever.  In this sixty minute program, we will highlight partner ideas from four outstanding programs that provide wonderful examples of building strong ties with other community organizations.

Getting There Together: A Message from the Director

So much has happened since our last Safe Routes Matters.  So many important decisions, events and announcements that will help to move forward the idea behind Safe Routes to School.  Starting with International Walk to School Day, the lucky seventh since the National Center was formed.  Once again the country set a new record for the number of registered events—4,250 to date, with one week of reporting to go.  All of you reading this had something to do with making that happen, so a big congratulations to you.

Safe Routes to School as a Catalyst for Community Change in Montpelier, Vermont

Six years ago, Community Connections, a local nonprofit that runs afterschool programs in Montpelier, Vt., public schools, identified a need to get students more physically active during the school day.  The organization saw the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program as the perfect way to get students excited about physical activity.

After receiving a non-infrastructure SRTS grant from the state, Community Connections spent the next two years running programs that concentrated on the five E’s: Education, Encouragement, Enforcement, Evaluation and Engineering.

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School offers brief summaries of eight programs that measured their walking and bicycling numbers and found an increase.  The resource aims to assist and inspire Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs to measure student travel patterns to look for possible changes over time and measure the progress of their activities.

Put the data to work.

Ultimately, the collection of school travel data and subsequent analysis can enable a SRTS program to measure the efficacy of its programs, determine how successful it is and communicate its success to the community and potential funders.

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School is the third installment in a series of resources on getting and measuring results with SRTS programs. To read more about measuring and evaluating the results of an SRTS program, visit Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Traffic and Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Speeding and Distracted Driving.

Safety-based Prioritization of Schools for Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Projects: A Process for Transportation Professionals

The National Center has prepared a new resource, “Safety-based Prioritization of Schools for Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Projects: A Process for Transportation Professionals” that describes a straightforward way to identify the schools and specific locations that have the greatest need for pedestrian infrastructure improvements .

Getting More Students to Walk and Bicycle: Four Elements of Successful Programs

Though some Safe Routes to School programs have to address safety problems first, most programs ultimately aim to increase walking and bicycling among students. Some programs yield a greater response than imagined; others start out by showing great promise, but end up not reaching their goals.

The National Center for Safe Routes to School, in an effort to better understand what factors might contribute to increases in walking and bicycling, examined programs for elements linked to measured walking and bicycling outcomes.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

Fall 2011 Mini-grant Call for Applications

The National Center for Safe Routes to School is now accepting applications for 25 mini-grants of $1,000 each. These mini-grants support the goal of Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs, which is to enable and encourage children to safely walk and bicycle to school. SRTS programs are implemented nationwide by parents, students, schools, community leaders, and local, state, and tribal governments. Applications are due Wednesday, May 18, 2011.

Safe Routes to School Noteworthy Practices Guide: A Compendium of State SRTS Program Practices

In 2005, the United States Congress established the national Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program in Section 1404 of the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (SAFETEA-LU). Through a combination of engineering, education, encouragement, enforcement and evaluation strategies, the program was developed to address traffic safety, traffic congestion and air quality issues around schools, while also acknowledging the health benefits of active school travel.

Working Together to Advance Safe Routes to School

Have you ever been confused about who does what to advance Safe Routes to School?

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School and the Safe Routes to School National Partnership
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