Making the case

How do others become interested enough in Safe Routes to School that they contribute to the project?

Developing a personal stake in SRTS makes people more likely to invest time, money, and energy. This personal interest and engagement can come about in diverse ways. For example:

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What percentage of morning traffic congestion is caused by children being driven to school?

Personal motor vehicles taking K-12th grade students to school accounted for five to seven percent of vehicle miles traveled and 10 to 14 percent of all personal vehicle trips made during the morning peak period (7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m.) in 2009.(1)  These percentages are based on an analysis of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Household Travel Survey and Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey. 

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March 2007 Tracking Report

The National Center for Safe Routes to School has released the March 2007 Program Tracking Brief. This monthly report is prepared by the National Center for Safe Routes to School to provide information about state Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs. Each month, a different snapshot and brief analysis of one key trend across all state programs is presented.

Highlights from the March 2007 report include:

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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How can we start a Safe Routes to School program with no money?

An important first step is to assemble a group of people willing to form a school traffic safety committee or safe routes task force. Involving other stakeholders early in the SRTS planning process helps ensure they will support the program. For detailed information on how to identify stakeholders, conduct a meeting and the steps in establishing a program visit the SRTS Guide.

Has there been a decrease in the number of students walking or bicycling to school?

There has been a decrease in the percentage of school-aged children who walk or bicycle to school over time. According to the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS):

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Safe Routes to School

Coalition for Sustainable Transportation (COAST) coordinates the efforts of 20 agency and community partners, including the Santa Barbara Bicycle Coalition, the PTA Safety Committee, various government and law enforcement agencies, Traffic Solutions and the Diabetes Resource Center. COAST's website offers information to help develop a school zone safety area, a public awareness program, and an education and safety-training program.

Authoring Organization: 
Coalition for Sustainable Transportation

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Safe Routes to Suits: Cracking the Liability Lies in Walking and Biking to School

A paper from the Chicago Land Bicycle Federation addresses liability concerns caused the local school district staff to ban students bicycling to and from school.

Authoring Organization: 
Chicagoland Bicycle Federation

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Categorization of State SRTS Applications

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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February 2007 Tracking Report

The Monthly SRTS Program Tracking Brief is prepared by the National Center for Safe Routes to School to provide information about State SRTS programs. Each month, a different snapshot and brief analysis of one key trend across all State programs is presented. It also provides a tracking table summarizing key attributes from all programs.

During the first 2 months of 2007,

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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