Enforcement & safety management

Amory, Mississippi: A five-year plan makes SRTS progress in Amory

Following a five-year plan has helped the city of Amory and its school district take steps to make neighborhoods safer for children to walk and bicycle to school.

Introduction

Following a five-year plan has helped the city of Amory and its school district take steps to make neighborhoods safer for children to walk and bicycle to school. Amory, a small, rural community, has a population of 7,500, and its two elementary schools and middle school are all within a two-mile range of each other. Families feel safe in Amory.

 “Kids get on their bikes and ride all across town,” says Carol Rogers, Coordinator for School Health and grant writer for the school district.

Liberty, Missouri: Community to Provide Education and Infrastructure

In summer 2007, the city of Liberty received $240,000 in Safe Routes to School funds through the Missouri Department of Transportation.

Introduction

Liberty, MO, is a small historic community with a population of less than 30,000 people. All nine of the elementary schools in Liberty are in neighborhoods where most of the students live within walking distance to school. Unfortunately, a lack of infrastructure discourages many parents from allowing their children to walk or bicycle to school.

Kansas City, Missouri: Safety Ambassadors Provide Consistency

The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), a regional planning organization for Greater Kansas City, is training people to become “Safety Ambassadors".

Introduction

The Mid-America Regional Council (MARC), a regional planning organization for Greater Kansas City, is training people to become “Safety Ambassadors” in an effort to provide consistency in the pedestrian and bicycle safety messages that children are learning. “This has been a very well-received effort,” said Aaron Bartlett, BikePed and Safety Programs Manager for MARC.

Columbia, Missouri: New drop-off area creates excitement about walking to school

When the PedNet Coalition in Columbia, MO organized daily Walking School Buses at West Boulevard Elementary School in fall 2006, only fifteen of the nearly 300 kindergarten through fifth grade students participated regularly.

Introduction

When the PedNet Coalition in Columbia, MO organized daily Walking School Buses at West Boulevard Elementary School in fall 2006, only fifteen of the nearly 300 kindergarten through fifth grade students participated regularly.

Since then, the participation rate has grown to 65 students.

Cape Girardeau, Missouri: School program generates community enthusiasm

In 2007, the city and  school system received a $102,919 SRTS infrastructure grant from the Missouri Department of Transportation to install uniform safety signage and flashing beacons at 8 different schools throughout the city.

Introduction

Sometimes starting small makes sense. Instead of trying to inundate the city of Cape Girardeau, MO, with a wide range of Safe Routes to School (SRTS) activities, Dr. Mark Langenfeld, a professor in the department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation at Southeast Missouri State University, focused on organizing a Walk to School Day at Alma Schrader Elementary School, and the event received tremendous publicity.

New Hope, Minnesota: Slowing Down Vehicles in New Hope, Minnesota

New Hope obtained a $31,200 SRTS grant in 2007 from the Minnesota Department of Transportation to help slow down vehicle traffic around its Sunny Hollow Elementary School and also to develop an education program for students.

Introduction

New Hope obtained a $31,200 SRTS grant in 2007 from the Minnesota Department of Transportation to help slow down vehicle traffic around its Sunny Hollow Elementary School and also to develop an education program for students at the school. The school has 517 students, and few walk or bicycle to school due to challenges created by busy roads, said Eric Weiss, Community Development Assistant for New-Hope.

Duluth, Minnesota: Improving Pedestrian Safety at Stowe Elementary

In 2008, Stowe Elementary received $171,360 in Safe Routes to School funding from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

Introduction

Stowe Elementary School in Duluth, MN, has approximately 375 students in preschool through the fifth grade. The school is two blocks from a highway, which creates a barrier for children who want to bicycle or walk to school but must cross the highway. Additionally, many of the neighborhoods surrounding the school lack sidewalks, so some children who walk to school must walk on dirt paths that run next to the streets.

Duluth, Minnesota: Planning for Safe Routes

The Duluth-Superior Metropolitan Interstate Council (MIC) is the designated Metropolitan Planning Organization for the Duluth-Superior metropolitan area and began Safe Routes to School planning initiatives in the area.

Introduction

Cottonwood, Minnesota: Making it Safer to Walk to School

In 2008, the town of Cottonwood received $87,575 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Minnesota Department of Transportation.

Introduction

Lakeview School is the local kindergarten through twelfth grade school in the town of Cottonwood, MN. Cottonwood Lake separates the school and the town, and the students must walk around the lake and along a busy country road to walk or bicycle to school. The combination of the lake and the busy road make it difficult and unsafe for the children to walk to school, resulting in about 25 students walking or bicycling each day.

Lansing, Michigan: SRTS Program in Lansing, Michigan

Working together, township officials, county police, parents and school staff applied for and received $456,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to create a SRTS program.

Introduction

Winans Elementary is a kindergarten through fourth grade school in Lansing, MI. A survey of the school’s parents revealed that safety concerns were a main reason for parents not wanting their children to walk to school. Working together, township officials, county police, parents and school staff applied for and received $456,000 in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funding from the Michigan Department of Transportation (MDOT) to create a SRTS program that improved student safety.