Enforcement & safety management

Improving School Drop-Off and Pick-Up Zones

Authoring Organization: 
California Walk to School Headquarters

North Carolina Department of Transportation School Crossing Guard Training Program Manual

Authoring Organization: 
North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT)

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North Carolina Department of Transportation School Crossing Guard Training Program

Authoring Organization: 
North Carolina Department of Transportation (NCDOT)

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Florida School Crossing Guard Training Guidelines

Authoring Organization: 
Florida Department of Transportation and Florida School Crossing Guard Task Force
Resource File: 

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Do adult school crossing guards need to be trained?

Adult school crossing guard training is an essential step to help insure that the guard is performing properly. Training should be extended to substitute guards as well as those who supervise the crossing guards. Training methods include both classroom instruction and field exercises. Topics addressed should include:

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Where should adult school crossing guards be stationed?

No absolute national criteria exist for identifying which street crossings in a community require an adult school crossing guard. The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) provides some general federal guidance on how to determine the need for a guard at a particular location.

Some states and local governments provide further guidance or recommendations, but the conditions under which a guard is assigned to a particular location vary around the country.

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Who can be an adult school crossing guard?

An adult school crossing guard can be a paid employee or a volunteer member of the community. Paid employees may be preferred because an employer has the ability to train, evaluate and discipline an employee. Every prospective guard should undergo a basic physical examination and criminal background check. A guard should have good vision, hearing and mobility, be able to stand for long periods of time outdoors and to communicate well with others.

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Safe Routes to School: Practice and Promise

Authoring Organization: 
Center for Health Training, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)
Resource File: