Enforcement & safety management

Johnson City, Tennessee: Walking and Bicycling Path improves safety

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Introduction

Johnson City, Tenn., is an urban community with more than 65,000 residents. Along with Bristol and Kingsport, Tenn., Johnson City forms the tri-cities metro area, home to more than one million people.

Huntingdon, Tennessee: Huntingdon schools focus on safe sidewalks

Huntingdon is a small town in a rural community in Carroll County, Tenn., that is working with Huntingdon Primary School and Huntingdon Middle School to create a safer pedestrian and bicycle environment for its children.

Introduction

Louisburg, Kansas: City Officials and Students Work Together for SRTS

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, applied for received $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT).

Introduction

The United School District 416 in Louisburg, KS, worked with the city of Louisburg in applying for and receiving $174,297 in reimbursable funds from Safe Routes to School (SRTS) through the Kansas Department of Transportation (KDOT). This funding will help create a safer community for Louisburg Middle School and Louisburg Elementary School by improving the pedestrian infrastructure. After these improvements are completed, a student group at Louisburg High School will begin SRTS encouragement activities for the elementary and middle school students.

Kansas: The Kansas SRTS Program

The Kansas SRTS program has established itself as an influential and innovative state program.

Introduction

Since its inception in April 2006, the Kansas Safe Routes to School (SRTS) Program has celebrated many accomplishments. From the creation of a SRTS steering committee of individuals from a diverse range of transportation-related backgrounds to a press conference announcing award recipients, the Kansas SRTS program has established itself as an influential and innovative state program.
 

West Lafayette, Indiana: Improving Pedestrian Safety in West Lafayette, Indiana

The city of West Lafayette decided to develop and implement a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to improve the conditions for the children who walk to the schools.

Introduction

Cumberland Elementary School (kindergarten through third grade) and Happy Hollow Elementary School (fourth through sixth grade) are in West Lafayette, Ind. Together, the two schools enroll almost 1,000 students. The city of West Lafayette decided to develop and implement a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program to improve the conditions for the children who walk to the schools.

Tell City, Indiana: New Sidewalk System Will Promote SRTS Activities

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system

Introduction

In Tell City, IN, a $250,000 award in Safe Routes to School (SRTS) funds from the Indiana Department of Transportation (IDOT) and a $29,347 grant from the city will fund a 1.2 mile pedestrian and bicycle sidewalk system to serve William Tell Elementary School, grades pre-kindergarten through fifth.

Wilmette, Illinois: Bicycle Safety Goes Beyond the School Year

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people.

Introduction

Wilmette, IL, is a town near Chicago with a population of 28,000 people. With the combined efforts of its Bicycle Task Force and the local law enforcement, Wilmette implemented an encouragement program for bicycling around the town and to and from school.

Maryville, Illinois: Building Sidewalks in Maryville

During the 2006 school year at Maryville Elementary in Maryville, IL, 12 children regularly walked or bicycled to school.

Introduction

During the 2006 school year at Maryville Elementary in Maryville, IL, 12 children regularly walked or bicycled to school. One reason for the low number is the lack of sidewalks in the neighborhoods surrounding the school. An additional barrier, identified through parent surveys, is the perceived fear of predatory danger to children walking to school.

In March 2007, a Maryville Community Improvement Board member and the village police chief developed a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program and applied for a SRTS grant.

Machesney Park, Illinois: Collaboration is key to community’s SRTS program

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Introduction

Working together, the Village of Machesney Park, IL, and the Harlem School District received funding for a twofold approach to make the routes to school safer for children.

Children’s health is the impetus for the Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program in the 23,000-person Village, according to Karen Lemmons, the community development director for Machesney Park. The benefits of the program extend to making the schools and environment safer.

Chicago, Illinois: Community Makes it Safe for Children to Walk to School

The Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA) is a non-profit organization founded in 1962 to unite the members of its inner-city community in northern Chicago.

Introduction

The Logan Square Neighborhood Association (LSNA) is a non-profit organization founded in 1962 to unite the members of its inner-city community in northern Chicago. It can be dangerous to walk to school in LSNA because of gang violence and drug activity.