Education

The Walking School Bus: Combining Safety, Fun and the Walk to School

This guide outlines the benefits of starting a walking school bus as well as points to consider before launching it. Two general ways to conduct a walking school bus are described: 1) starting simple with a small group of friends or neighbors or (2) creating a more structured program to reach more children. The benefits, considerations and variations of each are detailed so that organizers can choose the approach that matches local needs.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Safe Routes to School

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Kidnaping of Juveniles: Patterns from NIBRS Juvenile Justice Bulletin

This Bulletin describes the offense of kidnaping of juveniles, using 1997 National Incidence-Based Reporting System data. Among other significant findings, the analysis reveals that such abductions are relatively uncommon, that there are three distinct kinds of perpetrators, and that the rate of juvenile kidnaping peaks in the afternoon.

Authoring Organization: 
United States Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Office of Juvenile Justice and Deli

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Child Development and the Aims of Road Safety Education

Authoring Organization: 
Department for Transport, London

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Personal Safety for Children: A Guide for Parents

Personal Safety for Children: A Guide for Parents provides information for parents about how to talk to children about safety, advice to parents about how to keep children safe, and tips to children about how they can protect themselves. The guide presents statistics about the risks of abduction and contains a list of resources, with phone numbers to call in an emergency and URL's of Web sites that can provide additional information. Available in English and Spanish in both PDF and HTML formats.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

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Know the Rules for Going To and From School More Safely

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

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Guidelines for Programs to Reduce Child Victimization

These guidelines detail the recommendations of National Center for Missing and Expoited Children's Education Standards Task Force for communities when choosing programs to teach personal safety to children. 20 pp.

Authoring Organization: 
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children

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What side of the road should I walk on?

For a road that has sidewalks on both sides of the road, it is acceptable to walk on the sidewalk on either side of the road (facing oncoming traffic or your back to oncoming traffic) because you are separated from the automobiles.

For a road with a sidewalk only on one side, it is recommended to use the sidewalk for traveling in either direction (with traffic or against traffic). Again the sidewalk helps separate you from the automobiles.

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Where can I find a bicycle safety curriculum for elementary school age students?

Please visit the resource section in the Education chapter of our Safe Routes to School Guide. Here you will find a host of resources and weblinks to bicycle safety curriculum.

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Do you have an image library?

The National Center for Safe Routes to School does not have an image library. However, if you are interested in images of children walking and bicycling to school please visit the International Walk to School Day photo library at IWalk.org. Here you will find hundreds of images searchable by county, region, city and year.

How can Safe Routes to School be used in the traditional classroom curriculum?

Safe Routes to School (SRTS) and safety education can be integrated into traditional classroom subjects to meet education standards in many ways. Examples include:

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