National Center Releases New Resources on Measuring SRTS Programs, Prioritizing Infrastructure Projects

The National Center for Safe Routes to School has recently released two resources designed to support SRTS programs: Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School and Safety-based Prioritization of Schools for Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Projects: A Process for Transportation Professionals.

SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School

Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Increase Walking and Bicycling to School provides an overview of eight programs that sought to increase walking and bicycling rates and measured their achievements. It outlines methods that local SRTS programs can use to measure the progress of their activities.

The resource aims to assist and inspire Safe Routes to School (SRTS) programs to measure student travel patterns to look for possible changes over time. Ultimately, the collection of school travel data and subsequent analysis can enable a SRTS program to measure the efficacy of its programs, determine how successful it is and communicate its success to the community and potential funders.

The resource is the third installment in a series on measuring and evaluating results of SRTS programs. To read more, visit Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Traffic and Getting Results: SRTS Programs That Reduce Speeding and Distracted Driving.

Prioritizing Infrastructure Projects

Most schools have some way that the physical environment for walking or bicycling to school could be improved for its students.  The process of identifying the schools and specific locations that have the greatest need for pedestrian infrastructure improvements can be time consuming, especially when it must be done on a city-wide or district-wide scale. The National Center for Safe Routes to School has prepared a new resource, Safety-based Prioritization of Schools for Safe Routes to School Infrastructure Projects: A Process for Transportation Professionals, which describes a straightforward way to tackle the task.

First, the resource guides readers through the process of prioritizing schools – identifying the schools with the greatest need and the greatest potential for improvement. Then, it offers a way to conduct field reviews of the highest-priority schools to further identify conditions and infrastructure needs. An accompanying Excel worksheet provides a place to track and document information gathered about each school and its relative priority for pedestrian improvements.